Title

Work Satisfaction of Arab Social Services Employees in Southern Israel

Date of Award

Spring 4-19-1994

Document Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Social Work (MSW)

Department

Social Work

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to describe work satisfaction of Arab social services employees in Southern Israel, to compare it with work satisfaction of Jewish social services employees, and to ascertain if work satisfaction of Arab and Jewish employees is either similar or different. In the State of Israel, the national government which has a historical conflict with the Arab people has to approve all local administrations, policies, taxes, and budgets. In this study two hypotheses are posited. The first hypothesis states that work satisfaction of Arab social services employees who are controlled by administrative structures nominated by the Israeli government differs from work satisfaction of Jewish social services employees. The second hypothesis states that work satisfaction of Arab social services employees who are governed by an elected local administrative structure is somewhat similar to work satisfaction of Jewish social services employees. Forty four employees of Arab and Jewish social services departments filled out questionnaires which included five dimensions concerning work satisfaction. They were divided into three groups: Group A included 15 Arab social services employees of two nominated administrative structures; group B included 15 Arab social services employees of an elected local administrative structure; and group C included 14 Jewish social services employees. I The findings of the study lead to accepting both hypotheses. Work satisfaction among Jewish social services employees was 4.35 on a S-Point Scale, (1= strongly dissatisfied... J= strongly satisfied). Work satisfaction among Arab social services employees who are governed by an elected local administrative structure was 3.95. In comparison, work satisfaction among Arab social services employees who are controlled by nominated administrative structures was 3.65. The findings in this study indicate that administrative structures, whether elected or not, can increase or decrease work satisfaction of employees, and that Arab social services employees are less satisfied than Jewish social services employees under the administrative circumstances explained in this study. Implications and limitations of this study are discussed later in this paper.

Identifier

SC 11.MSW.1994.AbuBader.SH

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